Who will help older Mainers stay in their homes?

At Home Downeast member Margaret Staples, 89, at her Brooklin home. Gabor Degre | BDN

At Home Downeast member Margaret Staples, 89, at her Brooklin home. Gabor Degre | BDN

It’s not exactly a hardship, but if I weren’t headed to Quebec on April 1 to celebrate a family birthday, I would most definitely be attending the Tri-State Summit on Aging in Concord, New Hampshire. This one-day event is aimed at anyone who’s interested in developing Aging in Place initiatives in their local communities, from policy planners and municipal leaders to agency heads and grassroots organizers.

Several of the breakout sessions will feature Mainers with important experience to share, including Kara Janes, program director for At Home Down East, a community-based network of volunteer services that supports older residents in seven towns on the Blue Hill Peninsula.

Change happens slowly, but work is underway at many levels to help Mainers live safely and independently in their own homes for as long as possible. If you’re interested in knowing more about what’s going on in your community, or in starting the conversation yourself, you’ll find a lot of useful information on the website of the Maine Council on Aging. Or you can contact council co-chair Jess Maurer at jmaurer@maine4a.org.

 

Meg Haskell

About Meg Haskell

Meg Haskell is a curious second-career journalist with two grown sons, a background in health care and a penchant for new experiences. She lives in Stockton Springs. Email her at mhaskell@bangordailynews.com.